Posts for: September, 2015

By Clark J Wright, DMD, PA
September 22, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
NewFrontTeethforaTeenagedDavidDuchovny

In real life he was a hard-charging basketball player through high school and college. In TV and the movies, he has gone head-to-head with serial killers, assorted bad guys… even mysterious paranormal forces. So would you believe that David Duchovny, who played Agent Fox Mulder in The X-Files and starred in countless other large and small-screen productions, lost his front teeth… in an elevator accident?

“I was running for the elevator at my high school when the door shut on my arm,” he explained. “The next thing I knew, I was waking up in the hospital. I had fainted, fallen on my face, and knocked out my two front teeth.” Looking at Duchovny now, you’d never know his front teeth weren’t natural. But that’s not “movie magic” — it’s the art and science of modern dentistry.

How do dentists go about replacing lost teeth with natural-looking prosthetics? Today, there are two widely used tooth replacement procedures: dental implants and bridgework. When a natural tooth can’t be saved — due to advanced decay, periodontal disease, or an accident like Duchovny’s — these methods offer good looking, fully functional replacements. So what’s the difference between the two? Essentially, it’s a matter of how the replacement teeth are supported.

With state-of-the-art dental implants, support for the replacement tooth (or teeth) comes from small titanium inserts, which are implanted directly into the bone of the jaw. In time these become fused with the bone itself, providing a solid anchorage. What’s more, they actually help prevent the bone loss that naturally occurs after tooth loss. The crowns — lifelike replacements for the visible part of the tooth — are securely attached to the implants via special connectors called abutments.

In traditional bridgework, the existing natural teeth on either side of a gap are used to support the replacement crowns that “bridge” the gap. Here’s how it works: A one-piece unit is custom-fabricated, consisting of prosthetic crowns to replace missing teeth, plus caps to cover the adjacent (abutment) teeth on each side. Those abutment teeth must be shaped so the caps can fit over them; this is done by carefully removing some of the outer tooth material. Then the whole bridge unit is securely cemented in place.

While both systems have been used successfully for decades, bridgework is now being gradually supplanted by implants. That’s because dental implants don’t have any negative impact on nearby healthy teeth, while bridgework requires that abutment teeth be shaped for crowns, and puts additional stresses on them. Dental implants also generally last far longer than bridges — the rest of your life, if given proper care. However, they are initially more expensive (though they may prove more economical in the long run), and not everyone is a candidate for the minor surgery they require.

Which method is best for you? Don’t try using paranormal powers to find out: Come in and talk to us. If you would like more information about tooth replacement, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Crowns & Bridgework,” and “Dental Implants.”


By Clark J Wright, DMD, PA
September 08, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: teeth whitening  

What you put in your mouth every day can have a significant impact on your dental health and the whiteness of your teeth over time. Here are some suggestions for foods and drinks that you can eat to help keep your teeth white and healthy after having them whitened by Dr. Clark J. Wright, your cosmetic dentist in Venice, FL.Teeth Whitening Food

Foods to Eat
If you want to keep your teeth white, there are a few foods that you should put on your grocery list. Nuts and seeds are good because they are hard, and as you chew them they remove extrinsic stains. Apples are good for the same reason and the juiciness also helps increase the production of stain-fighting saliva in the mouth. Eat plenty of raw broccoli as well to keep the surfaces of your teeth scrubbed clean. Keep in mind that while these foods may be good for your teeth, leftover particles still should be removed to avoid problems with plaque and bacteria.

Beverages for White Teeth
The best thing you can drink for whiter, healthier teeth is plenty of water. Tap water is beneficial because it contains fluoride, but even if you drink bottled water it is good for your dental health compared to drinking dark liquids like red wine, tea and coffee. Milk is high in calcium, which is good for your teeth, but be careful of drinking too much. Milk is also high in sugar, which can contribute to decay.

Another Important Tip
In addition to eating the right foods after a whitening procedure, you should also make it a point to increase your brushing habits. A recent survey by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) found that as many as half of adults don’t brush their teeth at night, and this is probably related to problems with tooth staining over time. Regular appointments with your Venice FL cosmetic dentist for professional cleanings are also important.

Take Care of Your Smile
You can keep your teeth white and bright for years after your whitening appointment if you eat right and brush twice every day. Also, remember to call Dr. Wright at his cosmetic dentistry office in Venice FL (941-493-5923) for regular checkups to maintain your gorgeous smile.


By Clark J Wright, DMD, PA
September 07, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: x-rays  
BitewingX-raysYourQuestionsAnswered

Radiographic (x-ray) images are an indispensible diagnostic tool in dentistry. One of the most routine and useful types of x-rays dentists take is the so-called bitewing. Here are some things you may want to know about this common diagnostic procedure.

What are bitewing x-rays?
Bitewings reveal the presence and extent of decay in the back teeth, specifically in areas where adjacent teeth touch each other. Unlike other areas of the teeth, these contacting surfaces between adjacent teeth can’t be examined visually. Bitewings can also show areas of bone loss around teeth — a sign of periodontal disease; however, they are not taken for that purpose because bitewings will not show the complete root surface that is surrounded by bone.

Why are they called that?
The name “bitewing” refers to how the film — or sensor, in the case of a digital x-ray — is positioned in the mouth: The patient bites down on a little tab or wing that holds the apparatus in place.

How often do I need them?
This is determined on a case-by-case basis, with the goal of not exposing you to any more radiation than necessary — even the minimal amount found in a series of bitewing x-rays. Your individual susceptibility to caries (tooth decay) and personal dental history will play a major role in determining how frequently you need radiographic examination — and, for that matter, how often you need to come in for routine cleanings and exams.

Are they safe?
The safety of bitewing x-rays is best illustrated with a comparison to the regular daily radiation exposure we get every day from environmental sources, which is about 0.01 millisieverts — the unit of measure we use for radiation. A series of 4 bitewing x-rays exposes you to 0.004 millisieverts of radiation — less than half of the daily exposure. Undetected tooth decay, which can spread quickly through the softer inner layers of teeth, is considered much more dangerous!

If a bitewing x-ray shows that there is tooth decay, what happens next?
If the cavity is very small, we may be able to treat it during the same appointment. If not, we will make a separate appointment to make sure it is taken care of promptly. The sooner tooth decay is treated, the better!

What if I have more questions?
Contact our office, or schedule an appointment for a consultation.




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